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Possible impacts of the greenhouse effect on commercial prawn populations and fisheries in New South Wales

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S S Montgomery

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Fisheries Research Institute PO Box 21 Cronulla NSW 2230
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Abstract

Penaeid prawns are currently the second most important fisheries resource in New South Wales, being worth ~$25 million annually at the point of first sale. Four species comprise over 99% of commercial landings (Table 1). Eastern king prawns are exploited offshore from the Swains Reefs off southern Queensland. (21ºS) to the Gippsland Lakes in eastern Victoria (38ºS). The fishery operates year round north of South West Rocks, NSW (fig. 1) and between summer and winter south of there. School prawns are exploited offshore between Noosa heads in southern Queensland (26 ºS) and Gippsland lakes from spring through to winter. Commercial and recreational estuarine fisheries for both of these species operate between Noosa Heads and Gippsland Lakes between spring and autumn. Likewise, greasyback prawns are cought between Noosa Heads and Gippsland Lakes from spring to autumn, but they are exploited only in estuaries. Royal red prawns are fished between Tweed Heads in northern NSW (28 ºS) and Bermagui in southern NSW (36 ºS) but only offshore. The seasonality of this lattr fishery varies between regions but tends to become more year round further to the north.
How to Cite: Montgomery, S.S., 2010. Possible impacts of the greenhouse effect on commercial prawn populations and fisheries in New South Wales. Wetlands Australia, 10(1), pp.35–39. DOI: http://doi.org/10.31646/wa.135
Published on 07 Jan 2010.
Peer Reviewed

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